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Education should be protected regardless of the circumstances.

Half of the world’s refugees are minors. These children and young people are victims of international and domestic conflicts that are not only on the rise, but are also increasingly drawn out, affecting a greater number of people. The number of forcibly displaced people has steadily risen for over the past decade to reach 70,8 million.

 

Education should be protected regardless of the circumstances.
Et schools continue to be attacked as a result of armed conflict and widespread violence.

Violent attacks against education were committed in at least 74 countries from 2013 to 2017. Thousands of students and educators were killed or injured, with hundreds of schools and universities destroyed.

And, in the last five years, there have been over 14,000 attacks in 34 countries where schools are systematically targeted.

Armed groups often use schools for their operations or simply attack them outright.
Female students are targeted because of their gender. In just the last five years, schools in at least 18 countries have been attacked, include the bombing of girls’ schools, rapes, kidnappings and sexual harassment.
The roads that women and girls take to school pose significant danger of sexual assault, keeping them and their families in a constant state of fear. Over the last five years, parties involved in armed conflicts in at least 17 countries have sexually assaulted girls and women on the way to or from school.
The proliferation of extremist and world terrorist groups and armed conflicts related to natural resources.
The result is an increase in school drop-outs, particularly among girls, a group already at risk because of their age. Not being able to attend school means that girls lose their human right to education, a future, and hope.
Only 61% of refugee minors receive a primary education and less than 25% a secondary education.

Education should be protected regardless of the circumstances. Yet schools continue to be attacked as a result of armed conflict and widespread violence.

Students deserve respect and special protection. Their right to education is recognised in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and the Convention on the Rights of the Child. And International humanitarian law contains norms to protect the needs and basic rights of non-combatant and refugee people, including education for children and youth.

Entreculturas is committed to creating violence-free schools for peace, for reconciliation and for coming together for all children that have been forced from their homes. Schools that not only offer a quality education, but also provide holistic protection through psychosocial support while also strengthening students’ capacity for resilience and recovery.

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These schools are a refuge.