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SERGI CÁMARA ©Photo

We work tirelessly to ensure that schools continue to protect children

School closures in response to the Covid-19 crisis threaten to reverse the progress made in access to education for millions of refugee children and in their protection from violence, as schools are often the entry point for child protection interventions.

Together with our partner organisations, the Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS) and Fe y Alegría, we continue our efforts ensure that the school continues to protect children. Which means that despite school closures, we continue to provide children in-home support through distance learning, continue to provide a daily meal with the food we deliver to families, and continue to defend them against violence.

LEBANON: Distance learning in a minute

Millions have fled the war in Syria, now in its ninth year, and more than a million of these refugees now live in extremely marginalised conditions in Lebanon.
We work together with JRS to create safe spaces, places where refugees can learn and recover, helping over 3,000 children at our seven schools, more than 600 women at our social centres, and some 300 families through home visits. In addition to quality education,the schools provide essential goods like clothing, food, and transport.

JRS ©photo

In view of the school closures in response to COVID-19, we are facilitating access to online education through apps like WhatsApp, which teachers use to send one-minute videos explaining their lessons. We also use other online platforms where students and teachers can post videos and participate in exercises.
We continue to provide psychosocial support through online groups and telephone calls, and home visiting teams can be reached via telephone hotlines.
We are providing food to more than 5,000 families and hygiene kits for more than 800 families to help mitigate the economic difficulty that many of these families face and to replace the meals that many children receive at our schools.
///We are providing food to more than 5,000 families and hygiene kits for more than 800 families to help mitigate the economic difficulty

JRS ©photo

///We are facilitating access to online
education through apps like WhatsApp,

BURUNDI: manufacturing soap for hygiene and prevention

We work in the Burundi refugee camps that house both in-country displaced persons and refugees from Rwanda, Tanzania, and the Democratic Republic of Congo, who have fled the conflicts in their countries.

SERGI CÁMARA ©photo

///We serve nearly 18,000 students.
We have schools and nursery schools in the Kinama, Musasa, Nyankanda, Kavumu, and Bwagiriza camps, where our efforts are focused on learning and vocational training and we serve nearly 18,000 students.
Following the COVID-19 outbreak, we have implemented a contingency plan to ensure the safety and protection of our teams as well as that of the refugee and displaced populations.
///Following the COVID-19 outbreak, we have implemented a contingency plan
Since the main health and prevention measure is handwashing with soap and sanitizer, we have increased access to products like soap for the refugee population in and around the Kinama and Musasa camps by promoting soap-making in the camps.

SERGI CÁMARA ©photo

CHAD: The silent pandemic impacting girls

School represents a safe and protective space for many refugee girls and young women. School closures keep them from the only space they have for socialisation, exposing them to more violence, the burden of domestic chores, and child labour.

SERGI CÁMARA ©photo

Emergency contexts, specifically health crises, increase poverty, isolation, and school dropouts, in turn increasing the risk of physical and/or sexual violence, early pregnancy, child marriage, and female genital mutilation (FGM).
The full impact of the COVID-19 pandemic is expected to result in 13 million additional child marriages and, because of the disruption to prevention programmes, 2 million avoidable cases of FGM could occur in the next decade.
Which is why we continue to work, through radio and mobile phone awareness campaigns, to make families and communities aware of violence prevention and the importance of education for girls. We want to guarantee minimum educational coverage for girls and raise family and community awareness. In addition, we continue to provide psychosocial support during the crisis to build on the progress made.

SERGI CÁMARA ©photo

///The COVID-19 pandemic is expected to result in 13 million additional child
marriages and,

MALAWI: Ensuring children are fed

More than half of Malawi’s 18 million people live on less than $1 a day. However, nearly 40,000 refugees are living in the Dzaleka camp, just a few kilometres from the capital. Most refugee families have fled the genocide in Rwanda and the violence and war in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Burundi.

ISABEL MENCHERO ©photo

///Entreculturas and JRS provide educational support to more than 3,000 children in pre-school, primary, and secondary education, as well as 700 young adults in vocational training.
Today, 25 years after it first opened, Dzaleka continues to receive an average of 400 people a month and is in the grip of a chronic crisis, with extremely limited access to water, sanitation systems, livelihoods, health care, and education. Entreculturas and JRS provide educational support to more than 3,000 children in pre-school, primary, and secondary education, as well as 700 young adults in vocational training.

DANIEL VILLANUEVA ©photo

In response to the emergency, we are adapting classes to radio education and, because the rations distributed at school are often the only meal that most students eat, we are distributing oatmeal to 290 families (5 kilos per family).

VENEZUELA: aid and support at the borders with Colombia and Brazil

The crisis in Venezuela has caused the largest displacement of people in Latin America in recent history, making it the second largest migration crisis in the world. Some 4.5 million Venezuelans have fled the country in recent years and estimates put this number at 6.5 million by the end of 2020. The number of migrants and refugees grows constantly and those who leave the country do so in increasingly precarious situations.
Eighty-two per cent of Venezuelan migrants and refugees are staying in nearby countries like Colombia and Brazil, which have seen an increase in the number of Venezuelan nationals and are trying to respond with coordinated humanitarian aid efforts at a regional level. However, the numbers are so overwhelming that they have placed unsustainable pressure on national resources and public services.
The city of Arauca on the central border with Colombia, with a population of almost 90,000, supports almost 37,000 Venezuelan refugees. And on the border with Brazil, the city of Boa Vista is already home to more than 40,000. Because the city lacks enough shelters, many people, including families with children, sleep on the streets and live in public spaces like bus stations and hospital entrances.
///Estamos atendiendo a más de 3000 personas a través de la distribución de alimentos y de ayudas para el alojamiento
These people are most at risk of virus spread, as they lack access to safe and adequate housing, drinking water, and cleaning products.

SERGI CÁMARA ©photo

Moreover, they face severe food insecurity,
particularly children and pregnant mothers, who have higher rates of malnutrition. They do not have access to healthcare services or accurate information on how to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. There is also an urgent need to get the thousands of Venezuelan refugee children into school and to incorporate young people into national vocational training systems.
Es urgente poder escolarizar a los miles de niños y niñas refugiados venezolanos y poder incorporar a los jóvenes a los sistemas nacionales de formación técnica.
Working together with the Jesuit Refugee Service LAC, we are providing aid to over 3,000 people through the delivery of food and aid for housing, transport, and the purchase of medicines or medical care. We also offer psychosocial and legal support to help these refugees restore their human rights.

A GLOBAL reality

The current crisis has made it clear, now more than ever, that everything is connected. Which is why we think globally and act locally at the public level. To address emergencies, our efforts are focused on:

DANIELA MORREALE ©photo

///Eliminating the digital gap: identifying young people at the centres and organisations with which we work who lack access to computer resources and managing resources in response.
///Support for teachers to provide students with 100% online professional training.

DANIELA MORREALE ©photo

///Psychosocial and educational support for teachers and educators through the “Community Strategies for Youth Coexistence in Times of Crisis” training proposal, designed to provide tools that help support at-risk youth.
///The creation of educational proposals designed for young people under the motto “RSJ in Action”, targeted at both our national youth networks and to the international “Red generación 21+” network, which connects young people from over 27 countries.

Entreculturas continues to work so that education continues to provide protection

SERGI CÁMARA ©photo

Education saves lives.